About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CSPAN 13
CSPAN2 9
MSNBCW 9
CNNW 1
KGO (ABC) 1
WMAR (ABC) 1
WRC (NBC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 40
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)
'll have to see if it really makes a difference in the long term. >> alina cho from new york. >>> did you get your flu shot? still ahead, a warning that this year's flu season is starting earlier. [ male announcer ] rocky had no idea why dawn was gone for so long... ...but he'd wait for her forever, for any reason, and would always be there with the biggest welcome home. for a love this strong, dawn only feeds him iams. compared to other leading brands, it has 50% more animal protein. ...to help keep rocky's body as strong as a love that never fades... if he ever lets her leave again. iams. keep love strong. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] you've been years in the making. and there are many years ahead. join the millions of members who've chosen an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. go long. insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. well, if itmr. margin?margin. don't be modest, bob. you found a better way to pack a bowling ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked a question. it takes a long time to pack a bowli
're awake. national affairs editor for new york magazine and msnbc political analyst john heilemann. >> yeah, hi. and from cnbc headquarters, co-host of cnbc's "squawk box" andrew ross-sorkin. >> do i need to make a joke about school being out? >> we're kind of tired of that. >> you've grown up. you went from being a little kid to an old man. >> he's a grizzled old vet. >> the gray hair is coming in. >> there's no in between. and from washington nbc chief foreign affairs correspondent and host of "andrea mitchell reports" the lovely andrea mitchell. and "washington post" columnist and msnbc contributor jonathan capehart. thank you so much for being with us. why don't we just start really quickly with this story of the mere, mika, and that, of course, barack obama wins, the republicans lose, in a way that perhaps is more telling than just what one election result might suggest. >> well, i think it certainly does and it gives him a certain platform and credibility that perhaps he didn't have before. but watching as these fiscal cliff negotiations have gone through the holidays, it certainly is
. >> yeah. good thing you're awake. national affairs editor for "new york" magazine and msnbc political analyst, john heilemann. >> hi! >> yeah. hi. and from cnbc headquarters, co-host of cnbc's "squawk box," andrew ross sorkin. >> do i need to make a joke about school being out? >> that's so yesterday. we're tired of that, actually. >> you like kind of grown. >> he went from being a little kid to adorable. >> he's a grizzled old vet. the grey hair is coming in. >> and from washington, nbc chief foreign affairs correspondent, host of "andrea mitchell reports", the lovely andrea mitchell. >> happy holidays. >> and "washington post" columnist, jonathan capehart. thank you all so much for being with us. and why don't we just start really quickly with the story of the year, mika. and that, of course, barack obama wins, the republicans lose. and in a way that perhaps is more telling than just what one election result might suggest. >> well, i think it certainly does. and it gives him a certain platform and credibility that perhaps he didn't have before. but watching as these fiscal cliff neg
evening, americans, and welcome to "the ed show" from new york. wants new gun laws, right now. this is the ed show. let's get to work. >> we're going to change things. it's going to take a wave of americans, mothers and fathers, daughters and sons, pastors, law enforcement, mental health professionals, and yes, gunowners standing up and saying enough. >> the president lays out the way forward for sensible gun policy. so why are no republicans getting on board? i'll ask congressman jerrold nadler. >> at some point they have to take me out of it and think about what is best for the country. >> the president served up painful cuts, and republicans are literally running away from the table. >> hey, mr. speaker. >> congressman steve israel reacts to the gop's bizarre behavior. plus, today's big gm news means the death of a righty talking point. >> government motors. >> government motors. >> government motors, david cay johnston on a huge success story for government intervention. and the invisible man sitting next to clint eastwood wins time's person of the year. >> what do you mea
and speak tonight on both sides of the aisle. and i also note that the gentlelady from new york and the gentleman from connecticut also wish to speak. mr. president, senators -- their states who have been very hard hit should have the opportunity to speak. i'm going to take my rebuttal of the coburn amendments and just abbreviate them. with the exception of being willing to accept the amendment where you can't get emergency assistance if you are a tax cheater or if you've passed away, with the exception of a funeral benefit i really object to the coburn amendment. my objections have been so well articulated by the gentleman from new york, mr. schumer; by the gentleman from new jersey, mr. menendez, i'm not going to preet them. i'm going to ask unanimous consent that my written rebuttals be in the record. the presiding officer: without objection. ms. mikulski: and in the interest of time, i think we're all agreed the very intent to save money by adding delay and bureaucracy will cost money and will cost time in terms of getting people back on their feet in both their home and in
. >> that's right. some of the decorations were provided by residents of long island, new york, who sent 26 christmas ornaments. >> i'm reading now online and twitter now that one way that people can kind of grieve and also honor the community and honor those victims is these random acts of kindness. i saw a friend who donated $260 to her favorite challenge. whatever you can do in the number of 26. so maybe that's a good way. if you're not there in connecticut to honor some of those victims. >> so many people feel connected to this story in many ways. >> how could you not? it is a tragically human story. so whatever any of us can do, we >>> this morning on "world news now," powerful punch. the holiday storm strong enough to unleash a mudslide to derail a train moves from west to east. >>> the heavy rainfall, the nasty snowfall and what all of that mess means to holiday travelers. it's wednesday, december 19th. >>> from abc news, this is "world news now." >> good morning. i'm sunny hostin in for paula faris. >> and i'm rob nelson. we'll show you the storm damage and also get the latest from
, but they do not ever listen to the people. what people are the working for? host: james in new york as a deadline for independents. caller: i just want to point out something. 400% to 1000% increase in salaries versus the workers for the so-called job creators, along the way, the people are not making these increases in salaries. they talk about cutting taxes on the wealthy. well, what about giving money -- a fair percentage of an increase to the people that are doing the work? i never hear anything about that. it just seems to me that the unfairness starts there. host: that is james and new york. the lead story in this morning's boston globe with the headline "modest hope." [video clip] >> i just had a good and constructive discussion with senate and house leadership about how to prevent the tax hike on the middle class. i am optimistic that we may be able to reach an agreement that can pass both houses of in time. senators harry reid and mitch mcconnell are working on such an agreement as we speak. if an agreement is not reached in time between senator harry reid and harry mcconne
the democratic coalition is dominant, illinois, for example, new york state and california, you see a very different policy mix. which direction are they going? >> their policy mixes to mirror what's happening in washington, which is do not address any of your structural spending problems and need to add spending and ask your taxpayers in particular to-- the wealthier taxpayers to contribute more to that and it's a tax and spend policy. one of the problems that the states have, obviously it's not helping their economic growth and you're beginning to see a huge contrast on the ground between the economic situations of states that are reforming, and those that are not. >> paul: give us a couple of examples, kim, where is growth occurring where you're seeing it. the jobless rate, for example, in illinois the last time i checked was 8.8%. >> yes. >> paul: and meanwhile, wisconsin 6.9%, very interesting contrast. >> look at indiana, where it's also low, and-- yeah, north dakota, which by the way, steve mentioned you know, the fracking boom going up there. and i think it's below 5%, it's astonis
with president obama and mrs. obama, and ca, this tor wrote "the obamas," a reporter with the "new york times," and david marines's first half on president obama, barack obama: the story" came out as well. >> guest: yes, whenever there's a sitting president, it's a boom for publishers who jump on the wagon and publish as much books as possible. it's interesting to me in particular because it delves into the early life of barack obama from his childhood to a student in new york to early organizing days and he did a thorough job in terms of talking with a whole lot of different people who knew the president in his early life. cantor also clearly did quite a bit of reporting and investigation with her book about the marriage between barack obama and michelle obama, and rachel, from what i understand, took a larger view looking at the first lady and her larger ancestry and putting together a larger story as a result. >> host: now, bob -- >> guest: now, those -- >> host: go ahead, please. >> guest: no, i was just going to say of the three, my favorite was the marines. it was exhaustive and exhaust
tv.org. >> now, from albany, new york, we hear about the state-mandated new york state writer's institute. the program promotes cultural initiatives through author presentations, workshops, film screen things and more -- screenings and more. >> i can see each event just as vividly as i can see the posters before me. i'm donald faulkner, i'm director of the new york state writer's institute, and what we do, what i do is kind of herd intellectual cats. we bring a lot of writers through to albany to do readings, we also do a number of other types of programs, events, writing workshops and film series and programs with young writers and a summer institute that we run in saratoga. >> the life of the -- my life in the last few years was, i suppose you'd call it adventurous. but this thing ruined everything. [laughter] >> we go far and wide, find the best writers that we can and bring them to albany. it's like bringing the world to a particular place. and i don't think -- i can't think of any other organization, even some of the better known ones in major cities that have such a regular flow of
in nonfiction books and look ahead to 2013. joining us to help us are two guests in our new york studio, sarah weinman is the news director for "publishers marketplace" and bob minitz heymer is the book reviewer and reporter for "usa today." .. publishing operations, the google settlement moving forward in different directions. those olympic first stage apportion of bush publishing news. on the nonfiction front is a very strong year. in particular receipt of the best of 2012 list dominated by the likes of catherine coos behind beautiful forever is the witch was the winner of the national book award. the ongoing biography of lyndon johnson and andrew solomon's fire from the tree, only recently published over 900 each companion he had the king of different child-rearing examples of special needs children. so these two books on a very substantial books, but they're the tip the iceberg of nonfiction. >> host: minzesheimer, same question. >> guest: it was a big year for dead presidents. she remember robert harris is the fourth of five on monday june 10, which was just an incredible act of both repo
'll never crush the spirit of the workers but they have used the law with no public hearings new york committee action, no regular course of action during the legislation, during the legislative session, which is a lame duck legislative session by the way, no regular order, just a sneak attack thursday morning, the sixth of november, one month after the landslide election in michigan and throughout this country, that turned back the corporate money that was arrayed against the democrats. and arrayed against president obama. it turned that back. a resounding victory on november 6, on december 6, a sneak attack while during a lame duck session with no public hearings, no committee action, sneak attack. they announced it that morning, thursday morning. the sixth. and by 8:00 p.m. action to pass crush the union laws have passed to -- have passed both houses, house and senate, in michigan. less than 10 hours. it took to bing down 75 years of prosperity for all. now why would anyone want to crush the union and i'm not calling them right-to-work laws because as i told you earlier, there is n
good friend from rochester new york, the distinguished ranking minority member of the committee on rules, ms. slaughter. pending which i yield myself such time as i may consume. i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. dreier: all time will be yielded for debate purposes only. i would like to ask, mr. speaker, unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks on this resolution. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. dreier: mr. speaker, i was just thinking about the fact that there are 26 letters in the alphabet, and we have had the first three letters used in discussion here on the house floor today. a, b, and my friend from worcester brought up the letter c in talking about this. we have what is so-called letter b. and i'm not doing a "sesame street" skit here. letter b is what we are talking about, plan b, and i think about plan a. plan a is what the majority in the house of representatives has been trying for the last two years to implement
them back to new york. >> places like philadelphia. >> you look at murders across the tri-state area, so many come from virginia in that gun show loophole. bob mcdonald said we need more guns and give teachers guns. you know what? before you arm more people, look at the gun shows in virginia that, again, allow trafficking of these illegal arms up here. i mean, that they are bought legally and end up in the wrong hands. >> they close it after jim's report and mayor bloomberg is doing his own undercover work on this. >> that's one way we show we're not totally serious about cracking down on guns. another one is to say that connecticut is tough on guns, which a lot of people have said in the last few days, and they are by the standards we have. the fifth toughest according to the brady campaign. you can get any number of automatic rifles. you can have a grenade launcher attachment on these. it's not really tough on guns but by the standards we have. >> tough by the standards we have, which are very low. this slippery slope argument you can make on everything. if the tsa can frisk me at
the democratic coalition is dominant, illinois for example, new york state and california you can see a very different policy mix. which direction are they going? >> their policy mix is to mirror what is happening in washington. do not address any of the structural spending problems. continue to add spending and then ask your taxpayers, the healthier of the taxpayers to contribute more money.-- one of the problems these states have is obviously it is not helping their economic growth, and you are beginning to see a huge contrast on the ground between the economic situations of states that are reforming and some that are not. >> where is the growth occurring and where you arel: seeing it?h the jobless rate in illinois last time i checked was 8.8%. wisconsin was 6.9%. very interesting contrast. >> indiana where it is also low. north dakota which steve mentioned the fracking boom, it is below 5%. it is astonishing. >> it is 3%. >> so what about steve where do you think this is going? we are going to see now over the next two, three, four years. >> n ao doubt about it. >> what laboratories work
an e-mail, a facebook comment, or a tweet. let's look at the headlines from "the new york times." a similar headline this morning from "the washington post." maynard dropped the effort to avert the fiscal cliff. -- the john boehner drops the effort to avert the fiscal cliff. this from "the washington -- the wall street journal." the deadline looms with the fiscal cliff, that story available on line. joining us live, meredith who has been following this since it started. what happened to the caucus last night? caller: there is the surface answer, what happened when they were leaving the room. i think the most telling detail and what you have seen and the most outlets is that apparently when the speaker calls one of these meetings, it is so he can gen of the final votes and try to get enough votes to pass an initiative. that was not even the purpose of this particular session. he was calling them in to tell them they were not going to have the votes and to go home for christmas. that is a telling detail that apparently the speaker got in front of the room and said the serenity pra
, and the china he's representative said something. i forget what it was. "new york times" reports it this morning and susan rice says, "0 that's ridiculous ". i mean in terms of diplomatic-speak, she is nothing for being rough and tumble. she doesn't take any crap which is ideal some people don't like her. it's why i love her. thanks veronica. john, out in ferndale washington. >> that's in california? >> it's washington state. >> you got it. i am going to be mindful of the words you can't say on the radio >> bill: you can't either, john >> caller: callers, as well as yourself, let's go over the record quickly. shra they were afraid from glenn beck was going to do a program on her, threw her under the bus. acorn right under the bus. i wonder, has, you know, has -- did you ever see the front line special on pbs when barack obama was the harvard law review, they talked about how he caved into the conservatives at the harvard law review. i just wonder: does this man have any fight in him let me cylinder see graham and john mccain mall make crazy accusati
, puerto ricans in new york and chicago, very liberal, seeing the rise of foreign born latinos and their children who tend to be more conservative. on abortion, the majority believe it should be legal compared to 40% of the rest of the population. marriage, that's shifting. it is certainly shifted in the past five years, but there's still a good chunk of that electorat that's conservative when it comes to marriage. the question is with social issues is not are you going to scare voters away? you believe that those who vote exclusively for those -- are mostly religious people who are going to vote for the candidate who has the traditional positions. nobody's not going to go against the cap date because of the position of life and marriage within the community. >> right. it's scary for me because it's a place we're not looking to the future. as a republicans, we're counting on the older ones, not how the changes. >> you'll be surprised. with the children of foreign born latinos, there's still much more conservative than the rest of the population. >> okay. we'll come back to this
parents? >> yes. that was part of my interest. back in the new york city public schools, i had a great teacher. mrs. rauf would read -- mrs. roth would read the newspaper and the about martin luther king. he was rising in all of that, and the civil rights movement and she exposed us to lot. but i was just a junkie. the time i was 9 years old, i was handing leaflets out for robert kennedy. when i was 10, i made a big decision and broke with the democratic party and went to work for john lindsay who was running for mayor of new york. i went down to the liberal party headquarters and was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york'. some women thought this was really cute, this little boy and leaflets. and she asked me why. and i made the case and got in early start in my political career. she said this is for you and she hands this box of pastries. i took a back to the liberal headquarters and we opened it up and there were all of these doughnuts and a lot of $10 bills. one of my early lessons in politics -- the district leader grabbed the money and said you can keep the doughn
and for new york city and what we can expect >>> this morning a d.c. woman is waking up with her family for the first time in 16 years. she suffered from kidney failure and a stroke, and nurses say she had no memory of her past, but eventually she remembered her address and a nurse tracked down her family in oakland. she had not seen each other since 1966. >> it's hard. you don't have all the support you need growing up, but the rest of my family have been there for me. >> i didn't know he was that big. he's big! >> hawkins was in a d.c. woman's shelter before she entered a hospital. now she will celebrate the new year with her family. >>> right now crews are gearing up to help hundreds of thousands ring in the new year. everything remains nice and quiet, and it will be rocking tomorrow night. carson will ring in 2013 right from times square. and the crystal ball is in place for the big ball drop and the 2013 sign is ready. organizers are testing the confetti to make sure everything is ready to go. they threw handfuls of the confeety to check the airworthiness. >> what do you think they
. . >> a few miles away, jack pinto, also six, who's favorite new york giants player wore his name on his cleats during sunday's game. >> i was honored. . >> jack's friends from the wrestle l ling team showed up today in their uniforms. at anews conference, the usually stoic state trooper choked up when asking for privacy for the families. >> this time i can take a couple of questions. >> he also revealed there were two adult survivors of the smooting -- shooting. >> certainly, they will shed a great deal of light on the circumstances of this tragic investigation. >> with the school remaining a crime scene, sandy hook students will be attending an unused middle school in a neighboring town. . >> so, how do you get a break from the heart break? you take your kids to the mall just like when you were young. >> tonight, let them be kids, let them sit on santa's lap. let them watch the trains and make a wish list. >> i think i want a gum ball machine. >> a race car. >> a doll. >> let butterflies float in their stomach as excitement builds over the next eight days for the last four
will be announced this saturday in new york city. manzel is the favorite. >> the correct answer is johnny manzel will win the heisman trophy this year. that's all there is to it. >> bill: is he the freshman? >> he is going to win. >> bill: i'll take your word for it. i don't know any of them. i wouldn't know who to vote for. >> you don't get to vote. >> luckily, you don't get to vote. they will give it to the defensive player. collin klein had a very good year but nobody had a better season than johnny manzel. >> bill: i'll take your word for it. i'll tell you what, i have a vote on john boehner's baloney plan yesterday they threw out there on the table. i would love to get your take on it too at 1-866-55-press. my vote is no! my vote is laughing all the way. so, you know what was going on. so for the fiscal cliff negotiations so far it really is serious stuff because the last thing we can afford right now is another 2008 debacle where people lose their shirt because the federal government -- the politicians here membe
. no early voting in new jersey and new york, the states hardest hit so you had the week before, in other states you might have -- in north carolina significant number of the electorate already voted. so in both states ex-if if you cast a provisional ballot, it doesn't count at all. fortunately the state at the last minute had executive orders that opened that up. but how much education they were able get to out when people were just trying to unbury their lives and didn't have electricity and power. so allowing people who cast provisional ballots would have provided more flexibility, understanding ahead of time so people knew they could have gone to another precinct and voted and haste count. we want people to have their ballots counted but it wasn't able to get back to that location, so look at ways to expand the ability of people to vote and other options. expanding the way you vote permanently and looking how you inform people about the polling locations and ways -- text-messaging, or other -- that clearly broke down. >> for me, the problem with the electoral college. my job is to get
, puerto ricans in new york and chicago who are very liberal, but we're starting to see the rise of foreign-born latinos and their children who tend to be more conservative. i mean, just look at the pew numbers. on abortion still the majority believe that abortion should be legal compared to about 40% of the rest of the population. marriage, that is shifting. it has certainly shifted in the past five years, but there's still a good chunk of that electorate that is very conservative when it comes to, to marriage. the question is with social issues is not are you going to scare voters away. we believe that those who vote exclusively for those issues are going to vote, are mostly religious people who are going to vote for the candidate who has the traditional positions. nobody's not going to vote against the candidate because of their position of marriage within the latino community. >> right. it's scary to me because it is a place where we're not looking, again, we're not looking to the future. as a republican, we're counting on the older ones and not looking to how the vote is going to chang
americans, haitians, a big lgbt community, big arts community, a lot of internal migrants from new york, where the same way clark county has been -- you've got a pot, a core of white democratic activists that have brought california politics in nevada. ofmiami, you've got a core new york, northeastern democratic activists who brought those politics to south florida. and within that you're now starting to see very effective latino players, a democratic congressman who won a race against a highly flawed republican candidate, but still won, who formed a coalition that, you know, went from miami beach through working class neighborhoods, all the way down to the keys with very distinct different working class whites, gays, you know, snowbirders, and then a big chunk of cuban and non-cuban latinos. so, in the second part of it, you start thinking about identity politics in a different way. if you are thinking of a group that has flexed its muscles by virtue of being part of a coalition, as opposed to having flexed its muscles as being a plaintiff, as having been alone, as being outsiders sayi
is banning the cuts in new york city. so that and we are talking about, that ideology on the left, the progressive ideology. swatter some of the mifsud are commonly held by today's progress of squawks i've got about five myths that we tend to focus on the first to because those are the big juicy ideas and the bad ideas one is the natural things are good and number two, on the natural things are bad. number three, unchecked science will destroy us. number four, science is only relative any way, and number five, science is on our side. okay. the first one we learn all about them there. we are going to talk mostly about the most famous progressive today, president barack obama and his resume when it comes to science, but just to give you an idea about why these are important, natural things are good. that's behind the organic food movement. the rejection of the organic the modified to. unnatural things are bad. that is the fear of chemical and bpa, the fear of chemistry and the things that are unnatural and pesticides, fertilizers, unchecked science will destroy us and that is the nu
starts right now. >>> good evening, americans, and welcome to "the ed show" from new york. john boehner is getting pressure from all sides, and looking for friends where he can find them. this is "the ed show." let's get to work. >> i'm pretty confident that republicans would not hold middle class taxes hostage. >> democrats put the ball back in boehner's court, and they're turning the screws on the speaker. >> it's tough. but you have to do it. so is the point that you don't want to put your members on the spot, figure it out. >> democrats, business leaders, republicans, even santa claus are pressing boehner to do a deal. california congressman john garamendi is here with the latest. >>> the michigan sneak attack proves it again. union busting is all about politics. >> if a half a million people leave the labor movement every year, pretty soon you start having crimp in the political budgets of these unions, it has a direct effect on the presidential. >> and former ohio governor ted strickland on the politics of michigan and what it means forrest of the country. >>> plus, major news fro
was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york and a woman thought this is really cute, this little boy handing out leaflets. she asked me why, and i made the case for lindsay. i got an early start on my political work consulting career. she said that is so cute. she hands me a box of what looked to be pastry, all white box with string. i took it back to the liberal party headquarters and the open it up, and there were all these donuts and a wad of $10 bills. one of my early lessons in politics. >> tuesday night, david axelrod on his life in journalism and politics. that is followed at 9:30 with all five of new hampshire is all woman delegation. then, growing up at the white house, tuesday evening on c- span. >> george will spoke at washington university in st. louis about the role of religion in politics. the speech was hosted by the john danforth center on politics. we will hear from former senator john danforth, just before mr. will speaks. >> finally, it is my honor to introduce senator john danforth, who will introduce mr. will. the senator is a partner with the law firm. he gr
unemployment extended benefits, versus new york, which has the highest level of weeks allowed right now because of their differing unemployment rates. guest: it is administered by states. i think a lot of the state programs are too restrictive in their eligibility and have to look capps. there are some important steps forward in the american recovery act -- too low caps. there are some important steps forward and the american recovery act. i do not see a lot of prospects for much greater federal involvement any time soon. host: mableton, illinois on the line for independents. caller: i want to direct this to mr. tanner. i have never been in debt. i have a retirement, have a very nice pension from the state of california bar when i was a state police officer. -- for when i was a state police officer. we're not putting enough emphasis on what has happened in the last 10 years, seven trillion dollars t 6o de dollars trillion and we lost in pensions. --7 dollars trillion to $60 trillion that we lost in pensions. what would you do? how long do you think it should take to get out of this mess that th
metropolitan of boston, new york, l.a., and as a consequence of that, it can win elections but it always has difficulty enforcing the elections. it is somewhat ironic that party fell apart because of the slavery crisis. it was responsible for the whole idea of expansion westward and it was the issue of slavery in that territories -- what will the state is in the territories be? it fell apart as a consequence of its fundamental basis of american expansion westward. the whigs and the republicans were more or less opposed to expansion because they saw the expansion of slavery. in 1930 and 1931, republicans in the midst of the depression may have made the economic slump worse by doubling down on the terrace and the gold standard -- to colors of their post civil war policy that proved successful in the past but that were of doubtful at the sea in the new circumstances prevailing after the great war. what do i mean by that? the gold standard and the tariff worked as long as america is an out liar in a european dominated system. this is true all the way up to world war one so that the european powe
a nuclear bomb in new york city or something like that. it is very compelling. well, the argument is that if you use racial determination for college admissions, it is likely that there will be somewhat more -- somewhat more of unrehearsed, interracial conversations are in especially among students. under the african-american kids and a latino kids who get these preferences -- they will say something to the white kids and asian kids that have overwhelming compelling educational benefits for them. that is a argument that the university of texas is arguing. that is an exception of non-discrimination that the supreme court has recognized. okay? okay. i think that's ridiculous. and, indeed, the reason the court buys this is because there are social sciences out there and scientists who say this is true. now, increasingly, these educational benefits, which, you know, make only marginal improvements to education access, they are disputed. you know, it is increasingly disputed that their are any educational benefits. but i think it is also important for the court to bear in mind, and i t
and grandchildren. previously, a columnist and associate editor for "the new york sun" and chief speechwriter for read giuliani -- for rudy giuliani, he was responsible for writing the eulogies for the firefighters and fresh responders who died on 9/11. evelyn is also editor of the anthology "deadline of august, america's greatest newspaper columns." so now, let's listen to a conversation on growing up in the white house. please join me in welcoming them to the chautauqua stage. [applause] >> by way of beginning, last night, we were sitting up late talking about today's talk and i mentioned to linda, we had a column about your dad in it. you are quoted in it. i said, to that i don't have a copy of it. magically, there was a copy. it was called "touring dixie." this is just by way of saying -- hear the opening lines about lbj in which lynda features later in the column. "going to the south with president johnson is like going back to the chautauqua circuit." [laughter] you don't get better than that. as was indicated, we will just have a fun and casual conversation. we have two wonderful uniqu
and the big states, new york, california, and illinois, would have to much influence of a think there is a balance. others think that sent the candidates primarily go to these battleground states where it is too close to call to make up the 270 electoral college votes, that the other states get ignored and it suppresses turnout of therefore it is not good for democracy. so, there have been many amendments over the years. not many recently. they stopped in 1979. there was only one attempted to build this last session, 113th congress, did not go anywhere. many amendments attempted -- many states have innovations which we can talk about later if you like. to change the way they count the votes. host: let's go to the phones and go to casey from atlanta, georgia. caller: good morning. and good morning to your guest. guest: good morning. caller: i believe that this conversation is so enlightening and informative. professor thurber can certainly -- i believe 1988, in the state of west virginia, there was a democratic elector that was pledged for the democratic nominee, governor dukakis
't have virginia or new york, it wouldn't work. so it came about one of the great informal agreements in american legal history, there was an agreement, an informal agreement, that if the constitution were ratified as written bit 1787 convention, that there would be a bill of rights. and the statesmen, and there were statesmen in those days, kept their word so we had a bill of rights in 1791. and the result is we have a hamiltonian structure and jeffersonian bill of rights. and let me mention a few things about each of those. insofar as structure, they are different structures but one of the principal ones is separation of powers and checks and balances. we use those terms often interchangeably, separation of powers and checks and balances but they actually have a different thrust. separation of powers. teaches each brafrpbl of the government has a certain autonomy to act on its own. checks and balances works the other way around. checks and balances indicates the government cannot of course operate unless the branches interact with each other. there's a certain newtonian metaphor to
that because now there was magnetic tape. before that you had to go to fancy, highly capitalized studios in new york or l.a. or chicago. to record. so now the artist you are talking about are able to take advantage to communicate with these new technologies. on the education, can i say, i'm an old-fashioned guy. i still want those kids to come to a seminar on a campus for a while. i do. very much. but i'm also teaching a course next year and i'm trying to figure out how to get my 15-minute chunks looking at a camera and how to integrate that with the courses i teach students at penn. we are early days of this. nobody thinks -- >> a question there. >> carol thompson from strategic consulting. i have a question for each of the three panelists. we have been talking about innovation, education, and we have been talking what we are hoping for the future. i would like to ask you about the future. what are your greatest fears and your greatest hopes for 2016 and, 2020? it's a small question. >> i'm presume you don't think the world is going to end december 21st. . >> you are in a whole different compa
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)